Atticus is Now Mockingbird

I started Atticus Marketing two years ago, consulting on SEO  for a few law firms as a side gig to my day job.  Today, we’ve grown into a small team of marketing experts running 30 law firm websites.  Our service offerings have expanded from SEO and include everything from design to technology to business consulting.

In doing so, we’ve bumped into a great law firm consultancy out of Florida – Atticus Inc. (great name, if I say so myself).   I had breakfast with their CEO Mark Powers at the Orlando airport and learned much about the other Atticus. Most importantly, while our product offerings are fundamentally different, they are close enough that it is genuinely confusing.

So, as of today, Atticus is being transformed into Mockingbird. I value the consistency of branding with Harper Lee’s novel and the mockingbird branding offers a little more.  In researching the brand, I ran across an article by environmental journalist, Chris Clark:  An Intro to Mockingbirds: The Noisiest, Most Aggressive Small Bird You’ll Ever Meet.  I like that headline. A lot.  And if you know me even a little bit, the metaphor extends perfectly. Here’s how Chris defines the mockingbird:

The northern mockingbird’s absolutely fearless defense of its nest probably puts it in the running for bravest animal in the desert. It certainly makes it a contender for most annoying.

You have to give mockers points for guts. When’s the last time you took on an opponent who outweighed you by a factor of 1,500? . . . . Which doesn’t mean they’re above taunting them.

Heh.  So, here’s to bravely and noisily annoying opponents who outweigh you. Watch these two little birdies tenaciously and fearlessly drive off a huge predator:

1% for Good: Liddy Shriver Sarcoma Initiative

This is a crappy post to write.  Generally, I’m a few steps removed from Atticus’ 1% for Good campaigns – this time it hits home.  Courtesy of social media, I recently learned that one of my earliest Seattle friends, Sig  is undergoing treatment for Sarcoma – a connective tissue cancer usually associated with children, but occasionally cropping up in adults.

Sig on the PitchI played rugby with Sig at Old Puget Sound Beach – one of the premier rugby teams in the USA Superleague.  He’s every part the rugby player, a huge dude with the body fat of a teenage cross country star.  He looks like the love child of Ivan Drago and Arnold Schwarzenegger and specialized in laying our competitors flat on their backs.  Even his name is tough – Siegfried Kohl.  He’s also a paramedic and on many occassions was called to tape OPSB players up so they could get back on the pitch.

For this month’s 1% For Good – we’ve made a donation to The Liddy Shriver Sarcoma Initiative – which dedicates over 97% of donations to sarcoma cancer research.   Thanks to a slew of new clients, we had a record month in January – if you count among Atticus’ client base, thank you for making this possible.

Wishing you well Sig.

1% For Good: Sea Shepherd

I wanted pictures of the Atticus team with sweatshirts and flag from Sea Shepherd before I revealed them as our December 1% For Good donation, but today’s photographs and reports coming out of the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary have forced my hand. While Sea Shepherd’s fulfillment for their online store may be very slow – their boats are much faster at intercepting and driving out the Japanese whaling fleet from Antarctic whaling grounds.

Sea Shepherd

Sea Shepherd captain, Canadian Paul Watson has been combating the Japanese whaling fleet for years and has been featured on the show, Whale Wars. The Japanese fleet exploits a loophole in International Law to “harvest” whales for scientific purposes – supplying whale meat to the Japanese consumer market. According to yesterday’s statement by Sea Shepherd – they have driven the whaling fleet out of the southern whaling grounds.

Along with yesterday’s statement, Sea Shepherd released  images of 3 minke harpooned whales, as well as the gruesome bloody video of a whale being butchered on the deck.  Hardly “scientific study.”

Watson is facing numerous legal concerns – and while the organization may take heat from some within the legal community for their actions – we are very happy to offer a small piece of financial support to Sea Shepherd’s efforts to publicize and stop the slaughter of whales.

Update: Recently, the attorney who represents Sea Shepherd did an interview on KEXP to discuss his work with the organization and the recent U.N. court ruling to end Japan’s whale huntington. You can see it here on his blog article, ‘Why I Represent Sea Shepherd‘.

 

1% for Good: Get Your Rear In Gear in Memory of Katie Tinnea

When I first heard that my son’s upcoming first grade teacher was dying of colon cancer, my immediate reaction was to do everything to shelter him from the experience.  But I was wrong.  Over the year, we met Katie, submitted homework assignments and had parent teacher conferences. Our family ran two 5K’s in support of Katie and cancer research – the first with her and her Purple Power support team (that’s Katie below on the right). At the second race, just a few months later, Katie stayed home as she was just too tired.  But Purple Power was out in force.

Katie Tinnea

The consummate teacher, Katie made her personal experience her final lesson plan.  Parents in her classroom  answered some very hard questions from their kiddos.  The children started understanding their parents’ grief and learned that it was OK. We all finally had to find a way to explain that, “no, Ms. Tinnea is not going to be able to get better.”  At six and seven years old, the kids learned a lesson about the preciousness of life well ahead of schedule.

Before the end of the school year, we found ourselves in a church packed with kids wearing purple. My kids saw me cry for the first time.

Yesterday, 49 members of team Purple Power ran the Get Your Rear in Gear 5K in memory of Katie.  This month’s Atticus 1% For Good was contributed to that organization’s efforts to find a cure for colon cancer.

Katie’s husband, Ryan was there along with her daughter, Kennedy.  Kennedy turned 3 this year.

Introducing: Atticus 1% for Good

One of the reasons that I love working for lawyers is the good that many attorneys do for people in less fortunate situations.  In my role as an SEO – my work product is simply shifting a zero sum game – my clients get new clients who would have otherwise found a different law firm.  It is important to me that Atticus has a greater impact on the world.

Inspired by equal parts – Yvon Chouinard (founder of Patagonia and author of Let My People Go Surfing), the environmental organization 1% For the Planet, and some of the attorneys I’ve had the privilege of getting to know, I’ve decided to contribute 1% of Atticus revenues to a charitable cause every month.  Every month I’ll bring you the story of a different charity and how they are going about changing the world in a small way.

Challenged Athletes Foundation

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Challenged Athletes Foundation is an organization that helps people with physical disabilities so they can pursue an active lifestyle. Every year CAF hosts a major fundraiser in San Deigo – the San Diego Triathlon Challenge where 200 challenged athletes mix with roughly 600 able bodied triathletes to complete a one mile swim a 44 mile bike and a 10 mile run.  This year is the 20th anniversary of the event, which will be held in just 4 days.  My brother, Paul, is among the participants – over the past few years he and I have traded triathlon training tips and results. Suffice to say over this distance, Paul would utterly crush me. Last year, through fundraising efforts Paul raised enough money to completely fund grants for the following:

  • An Ossur Flex Run Jr. running leg for Daniel Pimental, who was born without a left leg.  The prosthetic will allow Daniel to play competitive tee ball with his able bodied friends.
  • A basketball wheelchair for ten year old Luke Acuna, who lost a leg when he was hit by a dumptruck while skateboarding.
  • A rugby wheelchair for James Sa, who broke his neck in his junior year of college.  James has set his sights on competing with the Team USA Wheelchair Rugby team at the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio.

Take a step back, and consider the world around us.  For those of you reading this who I count among my clients, know a portion of what you spend with Atticus is going back into the community to help enrich the lives of some very amazing people.  Thank you for making this possible.

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Atticus Clients Doubling Traffic

This is the first marketing post I’ve written – granted it is in the guise of an analytical review – but let’s be honest, I’m showing off results here.

Every four weeks I report traffic growth numbers to my clients and I use those numbers to extrapolate an annualized growth rate.  (I use a straight line forecasting – in simple math terms, if you averaged 5% growth during a quarter, your annualized growth rate is 4×5% = 20%.)  Depending on the client, Atticus’ job is to exceed a 25-33% growth over pre-engagement traffic.

Through the end of September, Atticus clients are on track to more than double their traffic with a 103% annualized growth rate. Individual site performance ranged from -7% to 241%.

Q3 Growth Rate

How?

There are a few factors that contribute to this.  First and foremost, I carefully select clients that I’m confident I can make a solid impact for.  Ideal clients have either ignored their website or have worked with large legal focused SEO vendors who have been hammered by Google SPAM penalties.  I flat out refuse to work with clients who have previously worked with one of the few good SEO vendors in the legal industry – as frankly, my improvements on a site that is already well maintained will be small.  Secondly, I work first on those tactics that will deliver the biggest bang for the investment – ideally, this is a technical tweak that has an immediate, large and persistent impact on traffic.   (See an technical fix example here.)

If you are still reading my marketing puff piece, thank you – as David Lobdell  said:

“He who tooteth not his own horn, same shall remain in a state of untootethness.”

Why (most) Americans Hate the Legal Profession

Let me start by saying, as someone whose company works exclusively with lawyers, I thought long and hard about posting this. . .

Today the legal industry suffered another self-inflicted wound to an already tarnished image in the way of an editorial on CNN’s homepage by attorney, Danny Cevallos.  In his post, Cervallos questions the brave actions of Matthew Cordle – the young Ohio man who posted his heartbreaking story about killing someone because he was driving while intoxicated.

First Some Background

Over the past 7 years, I’ve had the privileged and unique opportunity to view the legal industry from within.  I sat at a PILMMA event and saw a demonstration of how the legal industry has pushed automative safety.  I’ve met lawyers like Jonathan Stein who has dedicated his career to battling the bottom of the corporate ethical barrel – Collection and Insurance companies.   I met Anthony Colleluori who fights tooth and nail on behalf of individuals who have no where left to turn.  I met Bruce Johnson who has done more to protect the first amendment than anyone alive.

Big picture – I’ve learned that the legal profession offers the largest counterweight for individuals when dealing with injustice from large entities – be it the police, corporations or the government.  Few non-lawyers ever get exposed to this perspective and part of my professional mission is to help improve the perspective of the legal industry among the general populace.

Cervallos Paints Lawyers as Morally Bankrupt

So it was very disheartening to read an editorial on CNN today damning the actions of Matthew Cordle.  Matthew’s powerful video has gone viral because he fully accepts responsibility for his action. Even while Cervallos recognizes the moral bravery in Matthew’s actions, he writes:

“Bravo right?  Wrong.”

And goes on to pick apart the legal ramifications of the video.

“In making this video, it clearly appeared he was not coerced. He was not being interrogated or even interviewed by police. In fact, he volunteered this admission, stating that he was fully aware of the consequences.”

“Cordle’s voluntary mea culpa actually eliminated his strongest bargaining chip.”

Cervallos is unfortunately speaking for the entire legal industry when he prioritizes legal tactics with, in his own words, “doing the right thing.”  This is the root of why lawyers have such a persistently tarnished reputation.  The fact that Cervallos is most certainly correct from a legal perspective is irrelevant to almost everyone outside of the legal profession.  Step outside of the legal world for a minute and think about how non-lawyers would respond to this statement from Cervallos:

“While this may have appeared a morally correct thing for Cordle to do, our justice system can actually penalize those who “do the right thing” and volunteer admissions.”

Fighting drunk driving while recognizing the legal ramifications of sharing a gutwrenching story “may have appeared a morally correct thing”!  The editorial unfortunately doesn’t offer any suggestion for what would have been a more moral action and completely misses the point that Cordel clearly was placing his priorities above the legal system.  And this is where Cervallos misses the forest for the trees.  Cordel’s video will educate and certainly save lives from drunk driving accidents.  Suggesting that the legal industry as a whole views this as a mistake sends a very wrong message: that lawyers are always available to supplant morality and courage.

Unfortunately the actions of the Stein’s, Colleluori’s and Johnson’s of the legal world rarely get this kind of coverage.  But they should.

Avvo Partners with Atticus

I’m excited to announce today that I’ve formed a partnership with the very company that got me introduced to both Search and Lawyers – Avvo. I spent a lot of my time while at Avvo educating lawyers on the technical vagaries of search, so its no surprise that they continue to get asked questions, especially given their year over year 50% traffic growth.

What this means for Atticus?  I’ll be incorporating Avvo’s Ignite product into more of my clients’ marketing efforts.  Built specifically for the legal marketplace, Ignite brings a level of business efficiency to measuring and managing marketing efforts that attorneys haven’t had access to before.

Why I Started Atticus Marketing

Atticus Marketing - Online Search Marketing for LawyersWhen I left Avvo to run Urbanspoon’s marketing in 2011, I thought I was saying goodbye to the legal profession forever.  Instead, I found myself tugged back by attorneys looking for search help who I couldn’t work with while at Avvo.  What started out as occasional free SEO advice grew into moonlighting consulting gigs.  Working with these firms exposed me to the gross overbilling and outdated, ineffective and self-serving tactics employed by (some) legal industry marketing agencies.  I was now experiencing first hand the anecdotes I heard about during my days at Avvo.

Eventually I decided it was time to leave restaurants behind and go full time with Atticus Marketing with the following guiding principles:

  • Value – We deliver value NOT hours.  Value = traffic growth.
  • Transparency – We deliver good and bad news to our clients.
  • Targeted – We only work with clients we can cost effectively help.
  • Persistence – We create value that persists should the client choose to disengage.

Over the past year, I refined a process and set of tactics that are cost effective in driving traffic improvements for my moonlighting clients. This experience guided the development of a product called Simple Search to help a very specific subset of the legal market. Simple Search delivers a targeted, quantifiable improvement in website traffic at a regular, predictable cost and is designed for:

  • Small to medium, consumer facing firms.
  • Moderately competitive markets (by practice area and geography).
  • Firms who would rather work with clients than work with Google.

 

It’s nice to be back.